John Derian Paperweight, Nautilus

£50.00

The word decoupage comes from French "decouper", meaning to cut out - and can be described as the art of cutting and pasting cutouts to simulate painting on a wood, metal, or glass surface. Usually after the cutouts have been arranged and pasted, they are then varnished multiple times to create a lacquered effect. 

While based on folk eastern traditions, decoupage as a hobby originated in France in the 17th century and was used to decorate bookcases, cabinets, and other pieces of furniture. It spread throughout Europe and became all the rage especially in Italian, French and English Courts. Graceful, charming, and colourful designs, cut from pictures printed expressly for this purpose, were applied to fans, screens, and toilet articles. In the 19th century, peep shows, miniature vistas viewed through a small opening, were constructed of decoupage.

In the here and now, New York designer, John Derian through his love for paper and ephemera delves in his vast archive of 18th and 19th century prints to create his decoupaged goods. Together with a small team of artisans, these are produced in his studio in New York City by hand.

Care: Do not immerse in water, wipe clean. 

Dimensions:

Ø 8.89cm, height 3.8cm