White Lamy Safari Ballpoint Pen

£12.50

It seems to us, at Choosing Keeping, obvious that the pen pen market is dominated today by German manufacturers. Aside for a general national respect and enthusiasm for industry - indeed Germany is the second largest exporter of goods after China - singularity of vision and commitment to quality have endowed German pen makers with solid long lasting businesses. Lamy, Pelikan, Kaweco, Montblanc are all German owned and made household names while the Parkers, Conways Stewart and Waterman's of this world have been victims of many mergers and acquisitions and are today either dead or one foot in the grave...

One German company which deserves particular attention for its unique point of view is Lamy GmbH. Much like Braun and Olivetti, post-war companies interested with ideas of modernity, Lamy broke with the past by creating mass manufactured quality writing tools with a design focused approach. 

The company was founded by Josef Lamy in 1930. Prior to starting his own business Josef Lamy had in fact been working as a sales rep for Parker and this influence can be found in Lamy's early pens which used the same filling system as Parker and who's conservative designs were loosely based on the classic 1921 Duofold. 

Where he, and his son Dr Manfred Lamy did innovate radically is by the use of moulded plastics - as opposed to hand turned acrylics and celluloids. This functional and democratic material remains at the core of their business to this day. Indeed from the 1960s onwards Lamy really hit its stride producing pens in complete opposition to what was being made in the industry. The most successful Lamy pens being born from collaborations with clever designers for whom Bauhaus values were given full importance. 

Of all Lamy designs - in our opinion the pen that most exemplifies the above story of innovation, courage to be different, and function over form - is the Lamy Safari launched in 1980.

As a pen range made for high schoolers, and indeed it is used by every single German 10 to 15 year old, it is extremely durable and well balanced for easy and comfortable writing.

Now in its 30th decade it has become a true design classic and has awesome street cred amongst creatives for whom there is only one acceptable Bauhaus colour: Yellow. 

If you must, here presented is a white model - an allowance for a bit of 21c Apple mac aesthetic.

Pictured here, Brian chewing chewing and putting a black Lamy Safari ballpoint pen pencil up his nose in The Breakfast Club (John Hughes, 1985)

Capless
Sturdy metal clip
Material: high quality scratch free ABS plastic
Cartridge type: takes Lamy M16 Ballpoint cartridges 

Is sold with one M16 medium blue cartridge - other colours and writing sizes available here